Welcome to East Cliff Practice

We hope you find this website both useful and informative.

If you have any comments or suggestions about this site, or how it can be improved, please Contact Us.

Practice building

 

Stop Press

GP Vacancies

We currently have a vacancy for:

  • GP

See our jobs page to find out more and apply

 

Issues with telephone calls

Unfortunately we are continuing to experience a number of problems with receiving incoming calls. We have reported these to our telephone provider and they are actively working to resolve them. Please accept our apologies for the inconvenience caused.

 

Organ Donation Law in England is changing

What is changing?

From spring 2020, organ donation in England will move to an 'opt out' system. You may also hear it referred to as 'Max and Keira's Law'.

This means that all adults in England will be considered to have agreed to be an organ donor when they die unless they have recorded a decision not to donate or are in one of the excluded groups.

You still have a choice if you want to be an organ donor or not when you die.

Find out more visit the organ donation website.

 

Acute Care Team

At East Cliff, we believe that you should be able to access high quality medical care in a timely manner, appropriate to the urgency of your problem.  As a Practice, we are always looking for innovative ways to improve the service you receive whether this is care of an ongoing problem or help with an acute illness. Nationally, patient  demand for appointments is at an all-time high, whilst at the same time there is a recruitment crisis in general practice. We have for some time been developing a number of alternative solutions that benefit both patients and GPs.

As an initiative to optimise appointment use, we have introduced a new service The Acute Care Team.  It is staffed by three acute care practitioners, each of whom is an experienced nurse with additional training (and experience) in the management of new problems.

Each  day, this team will see the majority of patients with problems that need to be seen that day.  The Acute Care Practitioner will be supported by one of the practice GPs this will usually be Dr Aidoo on a Monday and Tuesday and Dr Macpherson on a Wednesday and Thursday. Friday will be covered by the remaining GPs on a rotational basis. The Acute Care Team will deal with your immediate medical need and will direct you towards your usual GP if any further care is needed.

 

Monthly Health Awareness Campaign

November Health Awareness - Men's Health

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK. It usually develops slowly, so there may be no signs for many years.

Symptoms of prostate cancer

Symptoms of prostate cancer do not usually appear until the prostate is large enough to affect the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the penis (urethra).

When this happens, you may notice things like:

  • an increased need to pee
  • straining while you pee
  • a feeling that your bladder has not fully emptied

These symptoms should not be ignored, but they do not mean you have prostate cancer.

It's more likely they're caused by something else, such as prostate enlargement.

Why does prostate cancer happen?

The causes of prostate cancer are largely unknown. But certain things can increase your risk of developing the condition.

The chances of developing prostate cancer increase as you get older. Most cases develop in men aged 50 or older.

For reasons not yet understood, prostate cancer is more common in men of African-Caribbean or African descent, and less common in Asian men.

Men whose father or brother were affected by prostate cancer are at slightly increased risk themselves.

Recent research also suggests that obesity increases the risk of prostate cancer.

Tests for prostate cancer

There's no single test for prostate cancer.

All the tests used to help diagnose the condition have benefits and risks that your doctor should discuss with you.

The most commonly used tests for prostate cancer are:

Find out more about how prostate cancer is diagnosed

PSA testing

The blood test, called a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, measures the level of PSA and may help detect early prostate cancer.

Men over 50 can ask for a PSA test from a GP.

Men are not routinely offered PSA tests to screen for prostate cancer, as results can be unreliable.

This is because the PSA blood test is not specific to prostate cancer.

Your PSA level can also be raised by other, non-cancerous conditions.

Raised PSA levels also cannot tell a doctor whether a man has life-threatening prostate cancer or not.

If you have a raised PSA level, you may be offered an MRI scan of the prostate to help doctors decide if you need further tests and treatment.

Find out more about PSA screening and testing in the UK

 

Accessible Information

We want to get better at communicating with our patients.

We want to make sure you can read and understand the information we send you.

If you find it hard to read our letters or if you need someone to support you at appointments, please let us know.

Please tell the receptionist if you need information in a different format or communication support.

For see our accessible information page for more information.

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NHS 111

111 is the NHS non-emergency number. It's fast, easy and free. Call 111 and speak to a highly trained adviser, supported by healthcare professionals.

NHS (nhs.uk)

The NHS website. Take control of your health and wellbeing. Get medical advice, information about healthcare services and support for a healthy life.

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Patient UK

Patient is one of the most trusted medical resources online, supplying evidence based information on a wide range of medical and health topics to patients and health professionals.


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