Welcome to East Cliff Practice

We hope you find this website both useful and informative.

If you have any comments or suggestions about this site, or how it can be improved, please Contact Us.

 

Stop Press

GP Vacancies

We currently have a vacancy for:

  • GP

Click here to find out more and apply

 

Changes to your Gabapentin or Pregabalin prescription

From April 1st 2019 Pregabalin and Gabapentin will be legally classed as "Controlled Drugs". There will be some extra rules and restrictions around supplying these medicines.

You might notice the following Changes:

  • If you are collecting your prescription from reception we will ask you to sign a record book.
  • When you (or your representative) collect your prescription from the pharmacy, they may ask you for identification if they do not know you, and will also ask you to sign for them. Most people will show a driving licence or a bank card.
  • Before you leave the pharmacy with your prescriptions it is a good idea to check you have everything you expected. It is possible that your Gabapentin or Pregabalin could be in a separate bag.
  • Your prescriptions for these medicines will be for no longer than 28 days. If you are taking a number of medicines we will give you a 28 day supply of them all. We hope this will make it easier for you to order and collect your prescriptions all at the same time.
  • Your prescription is only valid for 28 days. This means it cannot be supplied to you after this time. It is a good idea to collect your prescription from the pharmacy soon after the doctor has written the prescription.

We would like to reassure you that there will be no changes to the way you order your medicines. Please continue to order and collect your medicines in the same way, ideally electronically. If you don’t know how to do this ask reception for advice or go to Patient Access  and click on “Register.”

Please feel free to ask for more information from your pharmacy team or our reception team about these changes.

 

Organ Donation Law in England is changing

What is changing?

From spring 2020, organ donation in England will move to an 'opt out' system. You may also hear it referred to as 'Max and Keira's Law'.

This means that all adults in England will be considered to have agreed to be an organ donor when they die unless they have recorded a decision not to donate or are in one of the excluded groups.

You still have a choice if you want to be an organ donor or not when you die.

Find out more here 

 

Acute Care Team

At East Cliff, we believe that you should be able to access high quality medical care in a timely manner, appropriate to the urgency of your problem.  As a Practice, we are always looking for innovative ways to improve the service you receive whether this is care of an ongoing problem or help with an acute illness. Nationally, patient  demand for appointments is at an all-time high, whilst at the same time there is a recruitment crisis in general practice. We have for some time been developing a number of alternative solutions that benefit both patients and GPs.

As an initiative to optimise appointment use, we have introduced a new service The Acute Care Team.  It is staffed by three acute care practitioners, each of whom is an experienced nurse with additional training (and experience) in the management of new problems.

Each  day, this team will see the majority of patients with problems that need to be seen that day.  The Acute Care Practitioner will be supported by one of the practice GPs this will usually be Dr Aidoo on a Monday and Tuesday and Dr Macpherson on a Wednesday and Thursday. Friday will be covered by the remaining GPs on a rotational basis. The Acute Care Team will deal with your immediate medical need and will direct you towards your usual GP if any further care is needed.

 

Monthly Health Awareness Campaign

September Health Awareness - Shingles & Flu

Shingles is an infection that causes a painful rash. Get advice from 111 as soon as possible if you think you have it. The first signs of shingles can be:

  • a tingling or painful feeling in an area of skin
  • a headache or feeling generally unwell

A rash will appear a few days later. Usually you get shingles on your chest and tummy, but it can appear on your face, eyes and genitals.

Get advice from 111 as soon as you suspect shingles

You might need medicine to help speed up your recovery and avoid longer-lasting problems. This works best if taken within 3 days of your symptoms starting. 111 will tell you what to do. They can arrange a phone call from a nurse or doctor if you need one. Go to 111.nhs.uk or call 111.

How to treat shingles symptoms yourself

Do:

  • take paracetamol to ease pain
  • keep the rash clean and dry to reduce the risk of infection
  • wear loose-fitting clothing
  • use a cool compress (a bag of frozen vegetables wrapped in a towel or a wet cloth) a few times a day

Don't:

  • do not let dressings or plasters stick to the rash
  • do not use antibiotic cream – this slows healing

It can take up to 4 weeks for the rash to heal. Your skin can be painful for weeks after the rash has gone, but it usually settles over time.

Stay away from certain groups of people if you have shingles

You cannot spread shingles to others. But people who have not had chickenpox before could catch chickenpox from you. This is because shingles is caused by the chickenpox virus.

Try to avoid:

  • pregnant women who have not had chickenpox before
  • people with a weakened immune system – like someone having chemotherapy
  • babies less than 1 month old – unless it's your own baby, as they should be protected from the virus by your immune system

Important:

Stay off work or school if the rash is still oozing fluid (weeping) and cannot be covered, or until the rash has dried out. You're only infectious to others while the rash oozes fluid. You can cover the rash with loose clothing or a non-sticky dressing.

 

Flu

You can often treat the flu without seeing a GP and should begin to feel better in about a week.

Flu symptoms come on very quickly and can include:

  • a sudden fever – a temperature of 38C or above
  • an aching body
  • feeling tired or exhausted
  • a dry cough
  • a sore throat
  • a headache
  • difficulty sleeping
  • loss of appetite
  • diarrhoea or tummy pain
  • feeling sick and being sick

The symptoms are similar for children, but they can also get pain in their ear and appear less active. Cold and flu symptoms are similar, but flu tends to be more severe.

How to treat flu yourself

  • rest and sleep
  • keep warm
  • take paracetamol or ibuprofen to lower your temperature and treat aches and pains
  • drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration (your pee should be light yellow or clear)

A pharmacist can help with flu

A pharmacist can give treatment advice and recommend flu remedies.

Be careful not to use flu remedies if you're taking paracetamol and ibuprofen tablets as it's easy to take more than the recommended dose.

Speak to a pharmacist before giving medicines to children.

Antibiotics

GPs do not recommend antibiotics for flu because they will not relieve your symptoms or speed up your recovery.

How to prevent flu

The flu vaccine reduces the risk of catching flu, as well as spreading it to others.

It's more effective to get the vaccine before the start of the flu season (December to March).

Find out if you're eligible for the free NHS flu vaccine

 

Accessible Information

We want to get better at communicating with our patients.

We want to make sure you can read and understand the information we send you.

If you find it hard to read our letters or if you need someone to support you at appointments, please let us know.

Please tell the receptionist if you need information in a different format or communication support.

For more information please click here

Contact the PracticeSurgery NewsConditions and TreatmentsFind Local Services
NHS 111

NHS 111

111 is the NHS non-emergency number. It's fast, easy and free. Call 111 and speak to a highly trained adviser, supported by healthcare professionals.

NHS Website

NHS (nhs.uk)

The NHS website. Take control of your health and wellbeing. Get medical advice, information about healthcare services and support for a healthy life.

Patient UK

Patient UK

Patient is one of the most trusted medical resources online, supplying evidence based information on a wide range of medical and health topics to patients and health professionals.

To Review East Cliff Practice Click Here

Top of Page