Welcome to East Cliff Practice

We hope you find this website both useful and informative.

If you have any comments or suggestions about this site, or how it can be improved, please Contact Us.

Practice building

 

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GP Vacancies

We currently have a vacancy for:

  • GP
  • Practice Nurse
  • Social Prescriber
  • Focussed Care Practitioner

See our jobs page to find out more and apply

 

Issues with telephone calls

Unfortunately we are continuing to experience a number of problems with receiving incoming calls. We have reported these to our telephone provider and they are actively working to resolve them. Please accept our apologies for the inconvenience caused.

 

Important warning for patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

Our colleagues in Public Health are predicting a surge in the number of people who will get pneumonia over the next couple of weeks. It is important that if you have COPD that you ensure you have sufficient supply of inhalers and your other medication (if you have been told by you doctor that you need them). Try to and avoid mixing with people who already have coughs and colds over this time. Can we also take this opportunity to remind you to ensure you have had your flu vaccine this year and that you have had your pneumococcal vaccine in the past. Finally if you are still smoking we would encourage you to consider stopping to help your chest, discuss this at the surgery when you next attend.

For those who don't have COPD please contact us if you have a cough and fever that seems worse than usual, particularly if you are getting short of breath.

 

Advice on Antibiotics

Taking Antibiotics encourages harmful bacteria that lives inside you to become resistant. That means that antibiotics may not work when you really need them. The resistant bacteria can spread to your family. This puts you and your family at risk of more severe or longer illness.

Antibiotics are vital for some serious infections, and are needed during cancer treatments, and many operations. We need them to keep on working!

Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide problem. General public, health workers and policy-makers need to take action to avoid the spread of antibiotic resistance. 

The staff at East Cliff Practice take extra care to ensure antibiotics are prescribed for the right person, at the right time, and for the right illness. If used carefully we can protect antibiotics and Keep them working! The NHS are also running a campaign named “Keep antibiotics working.” You might of seen leaflets in the practice or at your pharmacy. 

How you can help?

This is a summary of the advice given by WHO ( the World Health Organisation) about ways you can help to prevent and control the spread of antibiotic resistance:

  • Only use antibiotics that have been prescribed for you.
  • Never demand antibiotics if your health professional says you don’t need them.
  • Always follow health professionals advice when using antibiotics.
  • Never share or use leftover antibiotics.
  • Prevent infections by regularly washing hands, avoiding close contact with sick people, practising safer sex, and keeping vaccinations up to date.
  • Prepare food hygienically, following the WHO Five Keys to Safer Food (keep clean, separate raw and cooked, cook thoroughly, keep food at safe temperatures, use safe water and raw materials).

See this YouTube video find out what could happen if antibiotics stop working, and how we can make better use of these vital medicines.

 

Acute Care Team

At East Cliff, we believe that you should be able to access high quality medical care in a timely manner, appropriate to the urgency of your problem.  As a Practice, we are always looking for innovative ways to improve the service you receive whether this is care of an ongoing problem or help with an acute illness. Nationally, patient  demand for appointments is at an all-time high, whilst at the same time there is a recruitment crisis in general practice. We have for some time been developing a number of alternative solutions that benefit both patients and GPs.

As an initiative to optimise appointment use, we have introduced a new service The Acute Care Team.  It is staffed by three acute care practitioners, each of whom is an experienced nurse with additional training (and experience) in the management of new problems.

Each  day, this team will see the majority of patients with problems that need to be seen that day.  The Acute Care Practitioner will be supported by one of the practice GPs this will usually be Dr Aidoo on a Monday and Tuesday and Dr Macpherson on a Wednesday and Thursday. Friday will be covered by the remaining GPs on a rotational basis. The Acute Care Team will deal with your immediate medical need and will direct you towards your usual GP if any further care is needed.

 

Monthly Health Awareness Campaign

January Health Awareness - Cervical cancer

Cervical cancer develops in a woman's cervix (the entrance to the womb from the vagina). It mainly affects sexually active women aged between 30 and 45.

Symptoms of cervical cancer

Cancer of the cervix often has no symptoms in its early stages.

If you do have symptoms, the most common is abnormal vaginal bleeding, which can occur during or after sex, in between periods, or new bleeding after you have been through the menopause.

Abnormal bleeding does not mean you have cervical cancer, but you should see a GP as soon as possible to get it checked out.

If a GP thinks you might have cervical cancer, you should be referred to see a specialist within 2 weeks.

Screening for cervical cancer

The best way to protect yourself from cervical cancer is by attending cervical screening (previously known as a "smear test") when invited.

The NHS Cervical Screening Programme invites all women from the age of 25 to 64 to attend cervical screening.

Women aged 25 to 49 are offered screening every 3 years, and those aged 50 to 64 are offered screening every 5 years.

During cervical screening, a small sample of cells is taken from the cervix and checked under a microscope for abnormalities.

In some areas, the screening sample is first checked for human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that can cause abnormal cells.

An abnormal cervical screening test result does not mean you definitely have cancer.

Most abnormal results are due to signs of HPV, the presence of treatable precancerous cells, or both, rather than cancer itself.

You should be sent a letter confirming when it's time for your screening appointment. Contact a GP if you think you may be overdue.

Find out more about cervical screening

What causes cervical cancer?

Almost all cases of cervical cancer are caused by HPV. HPV is a very common virus that can be passed on through any type of sexual contact with a man or a woman.

There are more than 100 types of HPV, many of which are harmless. But some types can cause abnormal changes to the cells of the cervix, which can eventually lead to cervical cancer.

Two strains, HPV 16 and HPV 18, are known to be responsible for most cases of cervical cancer.

They do not have any symptoms, so women will not realise they have it.

But these infections are very common and most women who have them do not develop cervical cancer.

Using condoms during sex offers some protection against HPV, but it cannot always prevent infection because the virus is also spread through skin-to-skin contact of the wider genital area.

The HPV vaccine has been routinely offered to girls aged 12 and 13 since 2008.

Treating cervical cancer

If cervical cancer is diagnosed at an early stage, it's usually possible to treat it using surgery.

In some cases, it's possible to leave the womb in place, but it may need to be removed.

The surgical procedure used to remove the womb is called a hysterectomy.

Radiotherapy is another option for some women with early-stage cervical cancer.

In some cases, it's used alongside surgery or chemotherapy, or both.

More advanced cases of cervical cancer are usually treated using a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

Some of the treatments can have significant and long-lasting side effects, including early menopause and infertility.

 

Accessible Information

We want to get better at communicating with our patients.

We want to make sure you can read and understand the information we send you.

If you find it hard to read our letters or if you need someone to support you at appointments, please let us know.

Please tell the receptionist if you need information in a different format or communication support.

For see our accessible information page for more information.

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