Welcome to East Cliff Practice

We hope you find this website both useful and informative.

If you have any comments or suggestions about this site, or how it can be improved, please Contact Us.

Practice building

 

Stop Press

GP Vacancies

We currently have a vacancy for:

  • GP

See our jobs page to find out more and apply

 

Issues with telephone calls

Unfortunately we are continuing to experience a number of problems with receiving incoming calls. We have reported these to our telephone provider and they are actively working to resolve them. Please accept our apologies for the inconvenience caused.

 

Information on the Coronavirus

Click here for the latest up to date advice on coronavirus 

 

Advice on Antibiotics

Taking Antibiotics encourages harmful bacteria that lives inside you to become resistant. That means that antibiotics may not work when you really need them. The resistant bacteria can spread to your family. This puts you and your family at risk of more severe or longer illness.

Antibiotics are vital for some serious infections, and are needed during cancer treatments, and many operations. We need them to keep on working!

Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide problem. General public, health workers and policy-makers need to take action to avoid the spread of antibiotic resistance. 

The staff at East Cliff Practice take extra care to ensure antibiotics are prescribed for the right person, at the right time, and for the right illness. If used carefully we can protect antibiotics and Keep them working! The NHS are also running a campaign named “Keep antibiotics working.” You might of seen leaflets in the practice or at your pharmacy. 

How you can help?

This is a summary of the advice given by WHO ( the World Health Organisation) about ways you can help to prevent and control the spread of antibiotic resistance:

  • Only use antibiotics that have been prescribed for you.
  • Never demand antibiotics if your health professional says you don’t need them.
  • Always follow health professionals advice when using antibiotics.
  • Never share or use leftover antibiotics.
  • Prevent infections by regularly washing hands, avoiding close contact with sick people, practising safer sex, and keeping vaccinations up to date.
  • Prepare food hygienically, following the WHO Five Keys to Safer Food (keep clean, separate raw and cooked, cook thoroughly, keep food at safe temperatures, use safe water and raw materials).

See this YouTube video find out what could happen if antibiotics stop working, and how we can make better use of these vital medicines.

 

Acute Care Team

At East Cliff, we believe that you should be able to access high quality medical care in a timely manner, appropriate to the urgency of your problem.  As a Practice, we are always looking for innovative ways to improve the service you receive whether this is care of an ongoing problem or help with an acute illness. Nationally, patient  demand for appointments is at an all-time high, whilst at the same time there is a recruitment crisis in general practice. We have for some time been developing a number of alternative solutions that benefit both patients and GPs.

As an initiative to optimise appointment use, we have introduced a new service The Acute Care Team.  It is staffed by three acute care practitioners, each of whom is an experienced nurse with additional training (and experience) in the management of new problems.

Each  day, this team will see the majority of patients with problems that need to be seen that day.  The Acute Care Practitioner will be supported by one of the practice GPs this will usually be Dr Aidoo on a Monday and Tuesday and Dr Macpherson on a Wednesday and Thursday. Friday will be covered by the remaining GPs on a rotational basis. The Acute Care Team will deal with your immediate medical need and will direct you towards your usual GP if any further care is needed.

 

Monthly Health Awareness Campaign

February Health Awareness - Stroke & The British Heart Foundation

A stroke is a serious life-threatening medical condition that happens when the blood supply to part of the brain is cut off.

Strokes are a medical emergency and urgent treatment is essential.

The sooner a person receives treatment for a stroke, the less damage is likely to happen.

If you suspect that you or someone else is having a stroke, phone 999 immediately and ask for an ambulance.

Symptoms of a stroke

The main symptoms of stroke can be remembered with the word FAST:

  • Face – the face may have dropped on 1 side, the person may not be able to smile, or their mouth or eye may have dropped.
  • Arms – the person with suspected stroke may not be able to lift both arms and keep them there because of weakness or numbness in 1 arm.
  • Speech – their speech may be slurred or garbled, or the person may not be able to talk at all despite appearing to be awake; they may also have problems understanding what you're saying to them.
  • Time – it's time to dial 999 immediately if you see any of these signs or symptoms.

Causes of a stroke

Like all organs, the brain needs the oxygen and nutrients provided by blood to function properly.

If the supply of blood is restricted or stopped, brain cells begin to die. This can lead to brain injury, disability and possibly death.

There are 2 main causes of strokes:

  • ischaemic – where the blood supply is stopped because of a blood clot, accounting for 85% of all cases
  • haemorrhagic – where a weakened blood vessel supplying the brain bursts

There's also a related condition called a transient ischaemic attack (TIA), where the blood supply to the brain is temporarily interrupted.

This causes what's known as a mini-stroke. It can last a few minutes or persist up to 24 hours.

TIAs should be treated urgently, as they're often a warning sign you're at risk of having a full stroke in the near future.

Seek medical advice as soon as possible, even if your symptoms get better.

Certain conditions increase the risk of having a stroke, including:

About the British Heart Foundation:

We fund over £100 million of research each year into all heart and circulatory diseases and the things that cause them. Heart diseases. Stroke. Vascular dementia. Diabetes. They're all connected, and they're all under our microscope.

Research has given us machines that can restart hearts, the ability to fix arteries in tiny babies, the power to give someone a heart they weren’t born with, and so much more.

But heart and circulatory diseases still kill 1 in 4 in the UK, they cause heartbreak on every street. And that’s why our work is as urgent and vital as ever.

Our research, is the promise to protect the people we love. Our parents. Our brothers. Our sisters. Our grandparents. Our closest friends.

Research is who we are. The promise of future preventions, treatments and cures.

Conditions like heart diseases, stroke, vascular dementia are all linked by your blood not flowing properly. That's why our research starts with your heart, but doesn't stop there. Our research is unlocking the connections between heart and circulatory diseases and their risk factors. 

Get in touch

Got a question or a query? Get in touch through our British Heart Foundation website or find a BHF office near you

Accessible Information

We want to get better at communicating with our patients.

We want to make sure you can read and understand the information we send you.

If you find it hard to read our letters or if you need someone to support you at appointments, please let us know.

Please tell the receptionist if you need information in a different format or communication support.

For see our accessible information page for more information.

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Patient UK

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